Motorists - Beware of Deer and Drive With Extra Caution as Daylight Hours Decrease With Earlier Twilight

Our Mission Statement

Established in 1974
This organization shall be known as the New Jersey Police Traffic Officers' Association

which is formed for the following purposes: 


  • To associate Police Officers engaged in the various areas of Traffic Safety into an organized body so they may be kept apprised of the latest technology, training, and legislation in the areas of Traffic Safety. 


  • To establish and advance cooperation in the police profession and provide guidance and educational techniques to accomplish the goals of the association. 


  • To contribute time and effort to the citizens of New Jersey by means of serving on statewide traffic safety committees. 


  • To recommend and support legislation consistent with the goals and purposes of this association and public safety.

Remember the five tenets of Below 100
Wear your seat belt
Watch your speed
Wear your vest
WIN: What's Important Now
Complacency kills
&
When in traffic
Wear your high visibility safety vest !!

Stay Safe Out There


NJPTOA, NJ DHTS, NJ Dept. of Transportation, NJ State Police, NJ Division of Fire Safety, NJ Turnpike Authority, South Jersey Transportation Authority, and other traffic safety partners have joined forces to make the motoring public aware of the requirement for drivers to

Slow Down and Move Over

when passing a stopped emergency vehicle, highway workers, and tow trucks.
#SlowDown #MoveOver
Bumper stickers for emergency vehicles are available for First Responders, please visit www.NJTIM.org to learn more.​

Est. 1974

Drivers need to be extra vigilant on roadways this fall as the mating season for white-tailed deer gets underway and daylight hours decrease.  Deer are more likely to suddenly enter roadways at this time of year, known as the fall rut, increasing the risk for sudden stops or collisions.  Deer activity is more likely to occur during early morning hours and around sunset, when visibility may be difficult.

“Deer are involved in thousands of collisions with motor vehicles in New Jersey every year, most of which occur during the fall mating season,” New Jersey DEP Division of Fish and Wildlife Director Dave Golden said.

These tips can help motorists stay safe during the peak of the annual fall rut:

  • Slow down if you see a deer and watch for possible sudden movement.  If the deer is on the road and doesn’t move, wait for the deer to cross and clear the road. Do not try to drive around the deer.
  • Watch for “Deer Crossing” signs. Slow down when traveling through areas known to have a high concentration of deer, so there is enough time to stop, if necessary.
  • Use high beams after dark if there is no oncoming traffic or vehicles ahead. High beams will be reflected by the eyes of deer on or near roads. If you see one deer, assume that others may be in the area.
  • Don’t tailgate. The driver ahead might have to stop suddenly to avoid colliding with a deer.
  • Always wear a seatbelt, as required by law. Drive at a safe and sensible speed, follow the speed limit, and factor in weather, available lighting, traffic, curves, and other road conditions.
  • Do not swerve to avoid impact if a collision appears inevitable. A deer may counter-maneuver suddenly. Brake appropriately and stay in your lane. Collisions are more likely to become fatal when a driver swerves to avoid a deer and instead collides with oncoming traffic or a fixed structure along the road.
  • Report any deer-vehicle collision to a local law enforcement agency immediately.
  • Obey the state’s hands-free device law or refrain from using cellular devices while driving.


For more information about white-tailed deer in New Jersey, visit www.njfishandwildlife.com/deer.htm

WELCOME

​​New Jersey Police Traffic Officers Association



Attention parents, have a conversation with your teen about the important rules they need to follow to stay safe behind the wheel of a motor vehicle. These rules address the greatest dangers for teen drivers: alcohol, inconsistent or no seat belt use, distracted and drowsy driving, speeding, and the number of passengers.

Facts about Teen Driver Fatalities

  • Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teens (15-18 years old) in the United States.
  • In 2019, there were 2,042 people killed in crashes involving a teen driver, of which 628 deaths were the teen driver.
  • Parents can be the biggest influencers on teens' choices behind the wheel if they take the time to talk with their teens about some of the biggest driving risks.


Teens buckle up less frequently than adults do. In 2013, over half of teens (ages 15-19) killed in crashes weren’t wearing a seat belt. It’s also impacting their younger passengers: when teens aren’t wearing their seat belts, 90 percent of their young passengers (ages 13-19) who die in crashes also aren’t restrained. Teens need to know that wearing a seat belt can make the difference between life and death.

​​​​​​Slow down and move over – it’s the Law!

Please submit all requests for information to be distributed to our association to: ​traffic@njptoa.org

and be sure to add it to your "Safe Senders" or "Whitelist" to ensure delivery of our emails.

Welcome to the official site of the New Jersey Police Traffic Officers Association (NJPTOA).

A unique statewide association, established in 1974, made up of Law Enforcement, Public Sector Agencies, and Private Sector Entities, all with the common goal of enhancing traffic safety in the Garden State.

 This site serves as a resource for our members to exchange ideas and build working relationships. 

On average, one pedestrian is killed every 2 days and 14 are injured daily on New Jersey’s roads.

Together, we can be the solution.

More than 6 in 10 people walk for transportation, exercise, relaxation, or for other activities. The benefits of walking extend beyond personal and physical, to environmental benefits that can lead to healthier, quieter, cleaner, and safer streets. Walking can also improve local economies and enhance social and community engagement, leading to more vibrant, resilient, and livable spaces.

Unfortunately, there were 6,205 pedestrians killed and 76,000 injured in traffic crashes in our nation's roadways during 2019.  On average, a pedestrian was killed every 85 minutes and injured every 7 minutes in 2019 across the country.


For more info: https://bestreetsmartnj.org/home/about-street-smart/#laws